Tag Archives: Inklings

Reading the Inklings: Getting Back on Track

Earlier this year, I decided to read something by as many of the Inklings as I could. It started off well (with Robert Harvard’s appendix in CS Lewis’ The Problem of Pain.) Then things derailed a little bit.

The end of the school year is always busy, especially when there’s curriculum to review for next year. Unfortunately, that put me off track on the book I had started: Lord Peter Views the Body by Dorothy Sayers.

According to the Kindle, I’m 11% in and was having a good time. Dorothy Sayers writes mysteries — a genre that has always intrigued me, but that I’m not particularly good at.

Clearly, all of the stories about Lord Peter (a detective of sorts) tie together, and I can tell that I’ve come in partway through a series. However, there’s still enough that I know what’s going on — even though I don’t have a full appreciation for the relationships between some of the reoccurring characters.

Now that I’m back to reading what I want to read, I’ll have an update on this book hopefully sooner rather than later.

What are you reading right now? Have you ever heard of Dorothy Sayers or read anything by her?


Tolkien Fans, Rejoice!

So I wasn’t able to buy Tolkien’s Oxford house (though not for lack of desire), but as it turns out, I may one day still be able to stay somewhere that Tolkien hung out. With CS Lewis and Robert Harvard and all of the other Inklings.

The famous Eagle and Child pub is getting an upgrade, which means there will now be seven rooms inside. (Read more here.)

How much will these rooms be? Maybe a bit too expensive. But that’s okay. A girl can dream, right?

Have you ever visited the Eagle and Child? Would you want to stay there?


Reading the Inklings: Robert Harvard

I’m officially one step closer to reading something by all of the Inklings.

A few weeks ago, I started The Problem of Pain by CS Lewis because it has an appendix written by Robert Harvard. (Read more about that here.) Though he did publish many other things, all of them are in medical journals so I wouldn’t have as much appreciation for them as I would if it were written for someone outside of the field.

As it turns out, Lewis’ words were exactly what I needed to read. While I don’t agree with everything, I do agree with most. More importantly, though, much of it resonated deeply with where I am right now, and that’s what I was hoping for.

After Lewis discusses pain of all sorts and some theological musings, Robert Harvard has a very short appendix with some medical insight. It was certainly interesting, though shorter than anticipated. I had hoped for a bit more than a few pages, especially when the Kindle told me there was 89% left to the book. Evidently, the last 8% is copyright information, Lewis’ biography, and footnotes. Lots of footnotes.

So, while not the most insightful into Robert Harvard, it was still a great read. Now, time to move on to the next Inkling!